HDA UK Media And Political Bulletin – 19 January 2017

Media Coverage

Open innovation underpinning UK R&D, says ABPI

Pharma Times, Selina McKee, 18 January 2017
In the search for new medicines, collaborative working between pharma companies and other firms continued to rise in 2016. Departing from the closed innovation model, the industry is now supported by open innovation – the subject of the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry’s report, Open for Innovation: UK Biopharma R&D Sourcebook 2016. Recent data shows the growth in absolute levels of investment in collaborative and outsourced drug research. Although this entails changes to internal company structure, it marks a new model for the industry. Dr Virginia Acha, executive director – Research, Medical and Innovation at the ABPI, said: “We are in a period of great change, not least with the UK embarking on a journey outside of the EU, but also as an industry. It is therefore vital for the future discovery and development of medicines that we continue to collaborate and explore outside of our companies, industry and sector.”

Netherlands bids to hosts EU drugs agency, replacing Britain

Reuters, Ludwig Burger, 18 January 2017  

Bidding negotiations have begun by countries wishing to become the next home of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in the wake of Brexit. The Dutch government made its bid public on Wednesday; Italy, Spain, France and Poland have also put themselves forward for the sought-after position. The Dutch government highlighted its experience hosting international organisations, Europol (the European Union law enforcement agency) and the International Court of Justice being two examples.

Parliamentary Coverage

There is no Parliamentary coverage.

Full Coverage

Open innovation underpinning UK R&D, says ABPI

Pharma Times, Selina McKee, 18 January 2017

The search for new medicines in 2016 saw a continued increase in collaborative working between pharma companies and other firms, academia, and catapults, pushing further away from the closed innovation model of old, according to a new report by the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry.

The Association says its Open for Innovation: UK Biopharma R&D Sourcebook 2016 shows that this step change towards open innovation is continuing to support the UK economy, given that the industry streamed £4.2 billion into UK R&D in 2015, marking an increase in investment of 8 percent over the prior year and equating to a fifth of all UK business R&D spending.

The latest figures demonstrate how pharmaceutical organisations have increased their absolute level of investment in collaborative and outsourced drug discovery in the UK over the last five years, with collaborations showing particular strength in oncology and rheumatology, it noted.

However, this increasing reliance on collaboration comes at a price – over the last ten years almost all large biopharmaceutical companies have significantly decreased their employment in in-house discovery in the UK. As these companies account for around 75 percent of all employment in the sector, the impact of this loss is “substantial”, noted Dr Neil Weir, senior vice president of Discovery at UCB.

Nevertheless, Dr Virginia Acha, executive director – Research, Medical and Innovation at the ABPI, said: “We are in a period of great change, not least with the UK embarking on a journey outside of the EU, but also as an industry. It is therefore vital for the future discovery and development of medicines that we continue to collaborate and explore outside of our companies, industry and sector.”

“The Government has announced the intention to use the forthcoming industrial strategy to mark our path forward for the UK, particularly given the decision to leave the European Union. We believe that life sciences should be central to that industrial strategy, and that critical to that strategy will be exploration about how the UK can be a global leader in the practices that will help us to be open for innovation,” added Dr Weir.

Netherlands bids to hosts EU drugs agency, replacing Britain

Reuters, Ludwig Burger, 18 January 2017  

The Dutch government on Wednesday joined several other European Union states in bidding to become the host country of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) once Britain leaves the bloc.

The London-based EMA has a workforce of about 900. It reviews experimental drugs and makes recommendations on market approval which the EU Commission usually follows.

The tussle over its future location is expected to form part of a complex horse-trading process triggered by Brexit. Italy, Spain, France and Poland – among others – have also put themselves forward as potential hosts.

The Netherlands “can offer EMA staff excellent housing, healthcare, education and public transport, and an environment where English is widely spoken,” the government said in a statement, also pointing to its experience in hosting international organisations.

The Netherlands is already the site of the International Criminal Court for war crimes, European Union law enforcement agency Europol and the United Nations’ highest judicial instance, the International Court of Justice.

Media Coverage

Open innovation underpinning UK R&D, says ABPI

Pharma Times, Selina McKee, 18 January 2017
In the search for new medicines, collaborative working between pharma companies and other firms continued to rise in 2016. Departing from the closed innovation model, the industry is now supported by open innovation – the subject of the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry’s report, Open for Innovation: UK Biopharma R&D Sourcebook 2016. Recent data shows the growth in absolute levels of investment in collaborative and outsourced drug research. Although this entails changes to internal company structure, it marks a new model for the industry. Dr Virginia Acha, executive director – Research, Medical and Innovation at the ABPI, said: “We are in a period of great change, not least with the UK embarking on a journey outside of the EU, but also as an industry. It is therefore vital for the future discovery and development of medicines that we continue to collaborate and explore outside of our companies, industry and sector.”

Netherlands bids to hosts EU drugs agency, replacing Britain

Reuters, Ludwig Burger, 18 January 2017  

Bidding negotiations have begun by countries wishing to become the next home of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in the wake of Brexit. The Dutch government made its bid public on Wednesday; Italy, Spain, France and Poland have also put themselves forward for the sought-after position. The Dutch government highlighted its experience hosting international organisations, Europol (the European Union law enforcement agency) and the International Court of Justice being two examples.

Parliamentary Coverage

There is no Parliamentary coverage.

Full Coverage

Open innovation underpinning UK R&D, says ABPI

Pharma Times, Selina McKee, 18 January 2017

The search for new medicines in 2016 saw a continued increase in collaborative working between pharma companies and other firms, academia, and catapults, pushing further away from the closed innovation model of old, according to a new report by the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry.

The Association says its Open for Innovation: UK Biopharma R&D Sourcebook 2016 shows that this step change towards open innovation is continuing to support the UK economy, given that the industry streamed £4.2 billion into UK R&D in 2015, marking an increase in investment of 8 percent over the prior year and equating to a fifth of all UK business R&D spending.

The latest figures demonstrate how pharmaceutical organisations have increased their absolute level of investment in collaborative and outsourced drug discovery in the UK over the last five years, with collaborations showing particular strength in oncology and rheumatology, it noted.

However, this increasing reliance on collaboration comes at a price – over the last ten years almost all large biopharmaceutical companies have significantly decreased their employment in in-house discovery in the UK. As these companies account for around 75 percent of all employment in the sector, the impact of this loss is “substantial”, noted Dr Neil Weir, senior vice president of Discovery at UCB.

Nevertheless, Dr Virginia Acha, executive director – Research, Medical and Innovation at the ABPI, said: “We are in a period of great change, not least with the UK embarking on a journey outside of the EU, but also as an industry. It is therefore vital for the future discovery and development of medicines that we continue to collaborate and explore outside of our companies, industry and sector.”

“The Government has announced the intention to use the forthcoming industrial strategy to mark our path forward for the UK, particularly given the decision to leave the European Union. We believe that life sciences should be central to that industrial strategy, and that critical to that strategy will be exploration about how the UK can be a global leader in the practices that will help us to be open for innovation,” added Dr Weir.

Netherlands bids to hosts EU drugs agency, replacing Britain

Reuters, Ludwig Burger, 18 January 2017  

The Dutch government on Wednesday joined several other European Union states in bidding to become the host country of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) once Britain leaves the bloc.

The London-based EMA has a workforce of about 900. It reviews experimental drugs and makes recommendations on market approval which the EU Commission usually follows.

The tussle over its future location is expected to form part of a complex horse-trading process triggered by Brexit. Italy, Spain, France and Poland – among others – have also put themselves forward as potential hosts.

The Netherlands “can offer EMA staff excellent housing, healthcare, education and public transport, and an environment where English is widely spoken,” the government said in a statement, also pointing to its experience in hosting international organisations.

The Netherlands is already the site of the International Criminal Court for war crimes, European Union law enforcement agency Europol and the United Nations’ highest judicial instance, the International Court of Justice.

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