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HDA UK Media And Political Bulletin – 5 April 2018

Media and Political Bulletin

5 April 2018

Media Summary

Lords hear of FMD concerns

Dispensing Doctor’s Association, 5 April 2018

 

The Dispensing Doctor’s Association reports that its Board advisor Baroness McIntosh of Pickering has raised the challenge of the falsified medicines directive (FMD) in a House of Lords debate on the effect of Brexit on health and welfare in the UK.

Speaking on behalf of dispensing contractors, she told health minister Lord O’Shaughnessy of the “huge cost implications, particularly for general practice” of the FMD. She also warned: “As I speak there is no clear guidance as to what the IT provisions will be. There is obviously a question mark over who will pay. I hope that the Minister will take the opportunity to explain today to what extent we will apply the falsified medicines directive.”

Lord O’Shaughnessy told the Baroness: “We are pushing ahead with the implementation of the falsified medicines directive… I met SecureMed, the body implementing it, yesterday.”

 

Lords warn over loss of reciprocal health rights after Brexit

The Pharmaceutical Journal, Debbie Andalo, 4 April 2018

 

The Pharmaceutical Journal highlights that the rights to reciprocal healthcare when travelling to other European countries under the terms of the European Health Insurance Card will cease after Brexit, according to a report from a House of Lords committee.

People with long-term conditions, rare diseases or those with a disability who rely on the current system could be put off travelling to the European Union (EU) if they are forced to pay for private health insurance cover instead of relying on their European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), according to the House of Lord’s European Union Committee’s report ‘Brexit: reciprocal healthcare’.

The report, which followed the peer’s inquiry into the impact of reciprocal healthcare post-Brexit, welcomed the government’s ambition for UK and EU patient rights to be protected if they are accessing healthcare at the point of Brexit. But the Lords expressed concern that until that right is made legally binding, entitlement is still unclear.

 

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Lords hear of FMD concerns

Dispensing Doctor’s Association, 5 April 2018

 

DDA Board advisor Baroness McIntosh of Pickering has raised the challenge of the falsified medicines directive (FMD) in a house of Lords debate on the effect of Brexit on health and welfare in the UK.

Speaking on behalf of dispensing contractors, she told health minister Lord O’Shaughnessy of the “huge cost implications, particularly for general practice” of the FMD. She also warned: “As I speak there is no clear guidance as to what the IT provisions will be. There is obviously a question mark over who will pay. I hope that the Minister will take the opportunity to explain today to what extent we will apply the falsified medicines directive.”

Lord O’Shaughnessy told the Baroness: “We are pushing ahead with the implementation of the falsified medicines directive… I met SecureMed, the body implementing it, yesterday.”

Liberal democrat peer Baroness Thomas of Winchester also asked the minister for reassurance that the UK would not find itself “behind the EU in the queue for approval of new treatments” if it did  not play any part in EMA processes. She told the minister: “As a result of Brexit, the influence the UK will have on the EMA will be significantly diminished compared with the role which the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency currently plays within the EMA. Negotiations should try to secure the quickest access to treatments for UK patients.”

Lord O’Shaughnessy replied: “We will continue to play a role in the EMA during the implementation period to make sure that there is no interruption to supplies. We will support the transition of the EMA to Amsterdam. Some specific details still need to be worked out about membership of the committee, rapporteur rights and so on during that period. The noble Baroness is right, they will be less than we have at the moment, but their exact nature needs to be determined.”

 

 

Lords warn over loss of reciprocal health rights after Brexit

The Pharmaceutical Journal, Debbie Andalo, 4 April 2018

 

Brexit will have a “significant impact” on the UK’s reciprocal healthcare arrangements with other European countries, peers have warned.

People with long-term conditions, rare diseases or those with a disability who rely on the current system could be put off travelling to the European Union (EU) if they are forced to pay for private health insurance cover instead of relying on their European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), according to the House of Lord’s European Union Committee’s report ‘Brexit: reciprocal healthcare’.

The report, which followed the peer’s inquiry into the impact of reciprocal healthcare post-Brexit, welcomed the government’s ambition for UK and EU patient rights to be protected if they are accessing healthcare at the point of Brexit. But the Lords were concerned that until that right is made legally binding, entitlement is still unclear.

They were also worried about rights to reciprocal healthcare for those who were not already accessing healthcare services when the UK leaves the EU.

The report said: “In the absence of an agreement on future relations, the rights to reciprocal healthcare currently enjoyed by 27 million UK citizens, thanks to the EHIC, will cease after Brexit. Other rights, provided for by the S2 scheme and Patients’ Rights Directive, which cover planned treatment in other EU member states, will also come to an end.

“Without more detail from the government about how exactly it intends to maintain reciprocal healthcare arrangements or provide a suitable replacement … we should not take the future of UK-EU reciprocal healthcare for granted.”

The peers also expressed concern about the impact Brexit will have on cross-border healthcare between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

Under the present arrangements, healthcare professionals can work either side of the border, patients can access cross-border healthcare and ambulances can travel freely.

“A hard border on the island of Ireland would be highly detrimental to healthcare for patients on both sides of the border,” the report warned.

HDA UK Media And Political Bulletin – 5 April 2018

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